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Proven Tips For Dealing With Acid Reflux

Is your chest in pain? Does it become worse when you are lying down? Do you feel it after a meal? Do you have that bitter taste inside your mouth? What about your voice, are you often hoarse, especially after eating? These symptoms point to acid reflux, which you can find relief from by reading on.

Do not eat your dinner less than three hours before you go to bed. Standing upright keeps stomach acid and food in your stomach where it belongs. Laying down can cause both to rise again. So, you should allow a few hours to pass prior to going to sleep.

Slippery elm, when ingested as a supplement, can help thicken mucous in your stomach and reduce erosion of the stomach lining. The acid in your stomach will stay where it belongs with this supplement. Two tablespoons mixed with water taken post-meal and at bedtime will be a huge help.

Trigger Foods

You should keep track of what you ate before experiencing acid reflux. Everyone who suffers from acid reflux has some kind of trigger foods that tend to bring it on. Once you have identified your trigger foods, you’re able to watch out for them.

You must stay upright when eating and for at least a few hours after your meal. If you lie down or recline, acid can move up your esophagus more easily as gravity isn’t holding it down. Your esophagus will feel much better when you get up on your feet.

Chew some cinnamon gum after each meal. When you chew, it produces more saliva. This helps neutralize stomach acid. People tend to swallow more when chewing gum, so any acid that’s in the esophagus can be cleared away. Fruity gums can also work. Mint relaxes your esophageal sphincter, so avoid it in gum.

Heart Attack

The feeling of a heart attack can be mimicked by severe reflux pain. Don’t ignore really bad chest pains. It is possible your chest pain is a heart attack. Contact your doctor to learn what you should do. You don’t need serious health issues because of a wrong self-diagnosis.

Place your bed on risers to help with night time acid reflux. There are several materials you can use to raise the bed up, including bricks or blocks of wood. Be sure your head is half a foot higher than the bottom of your bed. You can prevent stomach acid from staying in your esophagus by elevating your chest and head.

Eat smaller, but more frequent meals. If you often find yourself eating just one or two large meals per day, this can actually increase your risk of acid reflux. A full stomach is under so much pressure that the contents can be pushed upwards. This helps the acid in your stomach get into your esophagus. Eat a few small meals at intervals during each day.

Try not to drink too close to mealtime; drink in between meals instead. A full stomach puts pressure on your esophageal sphincter. When this happens, the stomach acids and foods you have just eaten may move back into your esophagus, causing damage and pain.

Slipper elm lozenges can be helpful. The active ingredient in the lozenge provides a protective coating for your digestive tract. This type of lozenge soothes the throat and relieves hoarseness and coughing that often accompany acid reflux. These can bought at most health food and natural remedy stores.

While it may feel like a heart attack, it probably is not. You know you don’t have the flu. You’re aware that it’s acid reflux that you can treat using this article. Make time and put in effort to feel better.